The capital of Argentina is one of the largest and most populous of South America’s cities. Set amongst fertile pampas, Buenos Aires is an urban expanse of stylish European architecture, wide boulevards and leafy parks. The city has the reputation of being one of the most elegant cities in South America, boasting not only grand architecture, but an equally impressive cultural scene; it has a higher concentration of theatres than any other city in the world, and is also considered a gastronomic tour de force, with culinary enthusiasts flocking to Buenos Aires to dine on classic Argentinean steak, farmed from local estancias on the pampas.

La Recoleta Cemetery

La Recoleta Cemetery

Perhaps Buenos Aires’ most interesting cultural heritage is as the birthplace of Tango. The story goes that in nineteenth century Argentina, gauchos from the lowland estancias would ride into the city at night to dance with the local girls. The gauchos, sore from a day in the saddle, danced with flexed knees whilst the ladies danced with their heads reclined right back to avoid the stench of the ranch men, who would go for weeks on end without bathing. Tango is still a celebrated part of Argentinean culture, and it can be seen performed all over the city, from the streets of working class La Boca to the stages of the city’s many professional Tango houses.

Tango

Tango

Modern day Buenos Aires is divided into barrios (neighbourhoods), each unique and full of character. The colourful buildings of the quirky La Boca district contrast with the grand Plaza de Mayo, Argentina’s premier square dominated by the pink presidential building. The bohemian San Telmo district, Buenos Aires’ oldest neighborhood and historical centre, transforms into a bustling market on Sundays. Elegant La Recoleta is a barrio of great historical and architectural importance and is home to the extravagant La Recoleta Cemetery, the final resting place of many of Argentina’s most acclaimed citizens, including Eva “Evita” Peron. The trendy boulevards and leafy parks of Palermo are perfect for people-watching, while the gentrified Puerto Madero dockland barrio is full of restaurants and bars, with fantastic views overlooking the River Plate.

La Boca

La Boca

If you have been inspired to discover Buenos Aires for yourself, check out our ‘Samba, Tango & Iguazu Falls’ Buenos Aires holiday, which also includes a visit to the vibrant Brazilian city of Rio de Janeiro and the spectacular Jungle clad waterfalls of the Iguazu Falls. Also take a look at our “Best of Argentina and Chile” holiday which combines Argentina’s beautiful capital city with the breathtaking Perito Moreno glacier in Argentinean Patagonia and Chile’s trekking paradise of Torres del Paine National Park. You can also see a full list of all our amazing Latin America holidays by visiting www.llamatravel.com or by ordering our brochure.

 

Wulaia Bay

Wulaia Bay

Tierra del Fuego, the archipelago at the end of the world, has been a beacon to explorers since the days of Magellan and Darwin. Lying off the southernmost tip of Patagonia, Tierra del Fuego encompasses a scattering of islands across the stormy South Atlantic and the Strait of Magellan. The islands of Tierra del Fuego, including the desolate Cape Horn and the Diego Ramírez Islands, are the forerunners to the frozen expanses of Antarctica, and exist in very harsh subpolar conditions. The largest island in the archipelago is Isla Grande de Tierra del Fuego, a rugged region of mountain ranges and steppe, fringed with glaciers and dramatic coastlines.

Cape Horn Cruise

Cape Horn Cruise

This land was once home to the Yahgan people, commonly believed to be the southernmost tribe in the world. These amazing people were able to successfully etch out a living in the harsh climate, hunting sea lions, diving for shellfish and traveling by canoe between islands to collect food. They kept warm by huddling around small fires, the rising smoke and embers of which were spotted by sailors on passing ships, who consequently referred to the island as the “The land of fire”. The Yahgan left strong impressions on all who encountered them, including Ferdinand Magellan, Charles Darwin, and the HMS Beagle captain himself, Robert FitzRoy. FitzRoy even went so far as to capture four Yahgan in an attempt to “civilise the savage.” He succeeded to the extent that the tribesmen were presented at court in London, but on return to their homeland they were quick to return to their former life style.

Ushuaia

Ushuaia

According to a survey in 2002, there are still approximately 2000 Yaghan in the area, but they are no longer the sole occupants of the archipelago. The capital of Tierra del Fuego, and the southernmost city in the world, is Ushuaia. The city is spectacularly bounded in the north by jagged and snow-covered mountains and on the south by the Beagle Channel, and acts as both the terminus of the world’s most southerly highway and the gateway to Antarctica. Originally built in the late 19th century by European explorers, Ushuaia still has a laid-back pioneer-town atmosphere, particularly evident in its charming houses, constructed with colourful timber and tin roofing. Despite its isolation, Ushuaia offers ample modern amenities and services making it an ideal base for exploring the epic Tierra del Fuego.

Tierra del Fuego

Tierra del Fuego

If you have been inspired to explore Tierra del Fuego yourself, you can find out more information here about our ‘Splendours of Argentina + Tierra del Fuego’, ‘Ultimate ‘Patagonia + Cape Horn Cruise’ and ‘Best of Argentina & Chile +Tierra del Fuego’ holidays. You can also see a full list of all our amazing Latin America holidays by visiting www.llamatravel.com or by ordering our brochure.

 

Happy New Year everyone! A new year means another 365 days to explore the world. Below are some of our top holiday choices for 2014. Colombia.

Beach in Tayrona National Park, Colombia

Beach in Tayrona National Park, Colombia

Colombia is set to be one of the brightest lights in travel in 2014. With its dark days now firmly in the past, the country is at last becoming better known for its many and varied positive attributes. The cities, coastlines and countryside of Colombia is truly spectacular. From  the snow-capped Andean mountains that rise up on the horizon, with the bustling capital city Bogotá nestled high amongst the peaks, to the lush green rolling hills of the Coffee region and the exotic Caribbean coastlines, where the vibrant city of Cartagena sits like a jewel.  You definitely get your money’s worth in terms of variety when you visit Colombia! At the moment Colombia is in that sweet spot where the streets and countryside are safe and beautiful, the prices are reasonable and tourists are not around every corner. So if you are looking for a great value authentic (not tourist-y) holiday in 2014 with stunning scenery, vibrant cities and fascinating culture – both past and present – then Colombia is the place for you. To see details of our holidays to Colombia, click here. Chile.

Torres Del Paine National Park, Chile

If your new year’s resolution is to see a slice of the wild, and you want more than just lazing on a beach for your 2014 holiday, then Chile may just be the perfect location for you. A long, thin slither on the coast of South America, Chile is flanked by the Andes to the east and the Pacific Ocean to the west. Chile may be only a hundred miles wide on average, but it has the diversity of landscapes of a much larger country, from the world’s driest desert in the north to the sparkling ice fields of Cape Horn in the south, and the enigmatic and totally unique Easter Island lying 3,700 km off it’s west coast. Chile is also home to Torres Del Paine National Park, a stunningly beautiful wilderness full of soaring peaks and glacial valleys that is fast becoming a mecca for trekking enthusiasts and nature lovers. To see a full a list of holidays to Chile please click here. Rio de Janiero, Brazil. All eyes will be on Rio in 2014, as it hosts the 20th FIFA World Cup, and continues expansive preparations for the 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games, when it will become South America’s first Olympic host city. A colourful city beautifully set on Guanabara Bay, Rio de Janiero is world renowned for its spectacular natural setting, vibrant carnival celebrations, beautiful beaches, lively nightlife and as the home of ‘Christ the Redeemer’, one of the modern Seven Wonders of the World.

Rio de Janeiro

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Rio may not be new to the spotlight like Colombia, but Brazil’s most famous city has been – and still is – undergoing some massive construction projects as it prepares to welcome the millions of tourists and athletes who will descend on the country over the next few years. New restaurants and hotels are being built, it’s once notoriously dangerous favelas are getting safer, and its infrastructure and economy is getting stronger. Big changes and big crowds are coming to Rio de Janiero very soon, so visit in 2014 to beat the Olympic crowds and experience the amazing atmosphere of a city on the rise. To see a full list of our holidays that include a visit to Rio de Janiero, please click here. Wherever in the world the year takes you, here at llama travel we are wishing you the very best for 2014. To see a full range of our holidays, and to order our brand new brochure, you can visit our website at www.llamatravel.com.

???? Llama Travel consultant James talks about Lake Atitlan, and why it is one of the most interesting areas in Guatemala.

“Lake Atitlan is truly a wonderful place, surrounded by three large volcanoes, it is a lake itself of volcanic origin and is widely considered to be deepest lake in Central America (at around 340 metres deep at the deepest point).

The lake is home to many Maya peoples, some of whom live on the shores of the lake in villages such as San Juan La Laguna or Santiago de Atitlan while others live in smaller villages in the mountains. All of these indigenous people speak a Maya dialect which apparently have varying degrees of mutual intelligibility amongst themselves.

Panajachel is the first stop for most people’s visit to Lake Atitlán. A reasonable sized town on the shore of the lake, this has become a hotspot for tourism of late and is a good place to start a visit as it has many facilities and shops. This said, my first port of call was San Juan La Laguna. This small village on the southern shore of the lake is made up of a Maya people called the Tz’utujil who were the victim of a joint attack by their neighbours the Kaqchikel when the Spanish Conquistadors arrived and looked for an ally to subdue the ruling Tz’utujil. Many of the customs and rituals still survive from this period and now the village is famous for its textiles and methods of weaving, and is a great place to pick up some souvenirs or gifts for your friends and family at home!

After visiting San Juan the next stop is Santiago de Atitlán; the largest lakeside community in the area. Perhaps the most noteworthy comment about this village is their reverence of folk saint ‘Maximón’. An effigy supposing to represent a form of a pre-Colombian god and mixing elements of Spanish Catholicism, it is not apprmaximón chichicastenangooved by the Roman Catholic church. Here, if you so wished, you can pay your respects to Maximón at various shrines throughout the area. You can also buy some of the many interesting and unusual handicrafts and wood carvings made by the locals.

There are many villages that you can visit on the lake, all of which offer a different perspective on the lives of the modern Maya people.”

If you have been inspired to visit Lake Atitlan and Guatemala yourself, you can find out more information about our ‘Best of Guatemala Holiday’ here, or if you want to go one step further and combine the interesting culture of Atitlan with the stunning natural beauty of Costa Rica, then check out our ‘Grand Tour of Guatemala and Costa Rica’. You can see a full list of all our amazing Latin America holidays by visiting www.llamatravel.com or by ordering our brochure.

Cut off from mainland Ecuador by the Pacific Ocean, the wildlife of the Galapagos Archipelago evolved a little differently to the rest of the world. A fact Charles Darwin famously realised on his visit to the island during his tumultuous Beagle voyage.

The Galapagos Islands contains more endemic species, such as the Flightless Cormorant, Galapagos Hawk sea_lions_puerto_egasand the Large Ground-finch, than almost anywhere else on earth, in itself a starling fact considering the relative smallness, and barren volcanic landscapes of the islands. What also marks the Galapagos Islands as unique is the breadth and fearlessness of its wildlife. Protected as a World Heritage Site and a Biosphere Reserve, the creatures of the Galapagos have had nothing to fear from humans, or virtually any other predator, for decades. Nowhere else on earth can you observe wild animals at such close quarters.

If that is still not enough uniqueness for one place, the Galapagos also has one more trick up it’s sleeve. The Archipelago is one of the few places in the world where there is something amazing to see all year round! Each month brings unique climate variations and wildlife viewing opportunities. The best time for naturalist tours is typically December through to May, when the seas are at their calmest and the weather at it’s the warmest. The summer months of June, July and August is also a great time to visit as the animals are at their most active. For divers peak season is typically from July – November, when whale sharks and a whole host of underwater wildlife can be found around the islands.

Check out below for a quick snap shot month by month guide of what happens when in the Galapagos Archipelago.

January

  • Galapagos lands birds, such as finches and warblers start building their nests.
  • Española Island’s marine Iguanas turn exotic shades of green, red and black.
  • Green sea turtles arrive to lay their eggs, it may be possible to see some on the shore.

February

  • The Greater Flamingos of Floreana Island start nesting.
  • Bahama pintail ducks begin breeding.
  • Marine iguanas nest on Santa Cruz.

March

  • Snorkeling can be done for longer periods due to the mild water temperatures.
  • Penguins are a common sight on Isabela and Fernandina Islands.
  • The air temperature can rise up to 30C (86F).

April

  • Waved albatross arrive on Española Island and begin their courtship rituals.
  • Green sea turtle and Land Iguana eggs begin hatching on Isabela Island.
  • The mating season of Frigate birds on San Cristobal and Genovesa islands is in full swing, with the males inflating their dazzling red throat sacs.

May

  • Blue-footed boobies perform courtship dances on North Seymour.
  • Waved albatross start to lay eggs on Española.
  • The Storm Petrels nesting season begins.

June

  • Southeast winds return and currents become stronger, resulting in choppier waters.
  • The Giant tortoises on Santa Cruz migrate from highlands to lowlands, searching for nesting places.
  • Humpback whales may be spotted as they migrate to the equator.

July

  • Seabirds are very active (breeding), especially the blue-footed boobies on Española.
  • Cormorants show marvellous mating rituals on Fernandina.
  • Lava lizards start with their mating rituals until November.

August

  • Galapagos hawks court on Española and Santiago.
  • Nazca boobies and swallow-tailed gulls nest on Genovesa.
  • Sea lion start giving birth to pups in west and central islands.

September

  • Sea birds remain active at their nesting sites.
  • Swimmers on Bartolome can enjoy the penguins swimming around them.
  • Sea lions are very active. Females have reached the estrus stage and because of this males are constantly barking and fighting.

October

  • Lava herons begin nesting.
  • The mating season begins for the Galapagos fur seals.
  • Blue-footed boobie chicks can be seen on Española and Isabela isnalds.

November

  • Good visibility under water for snorkeling.
  • The young sea lions play aqua-aerobics next to the snorkelers.
  • Jellyfish can be seen around the islands. The ‘genus Physalia’ is generally seen floating around Gardner and Tortuga Islets.

December

  • The first waved albatrosses are raised.
  • The eggs of the giant tortoises start to hatch.
  • The Islands of the Galapagos become lush and green as the rainy season begins.

If the above has inspired you to see the amazing wildlife of the Galapagos first hand. You can see a list of all our holidays to the Galapagos Islands here. You can also see a full list of all our amazing Latin America holidays by visiting www.llamatravel.com or by ordering our new brochure.

Sending my Dad to Peru

Earlier this year, former Llama Travel Consultant Suzi had to arrange a Llama Travel trip to Peru for a particularly special customer – her dad! Check out below for Suzi’s amazing blog about how she helped prepare her dad for the holiday of a lifetime, and to find out how he got on once be landed on Peruvian soil!

“In 2010 and 2011 I traveled around Central and South America and sent various emails home to my parents describing all of my adventures. Last year I finally convinced my Dad to go on a holiday to Peru. After discussing all of the different locations to visit in Peru, he decided that if he was going to go all that way he may as well see everything and chose our Grand Tour of Peru with the Inca Trail. This holiday visits Lima, the Amazon Jungle, Cusco, Machu Picchu, Lake Titicaca, Arequipa and Colca Canyon with a final stop on the Pacific Coast to visit the Nazca lines.Pisac Market

Once he booked the holiday, he started asking all the usual questions…. What vaccinations he needed, what clothes to take, will the altitude affect him?

I suggested that it was best to go the Doctor or travel clinic to double check which vaccinations he may need, as he has already traveled to places in Asia and Africa and so may already have had some of the recommend ones.

As my Dad was going to be visiting all different locations in Peru I advised that layers were the best option to take with him, as he was probably going to be getting sunny days in most places but colder nights when at altitude. A waterproof is always handy to take too.

In regards to altitude, it affects few people severely and is not age specific. The majority of people will feel slightly tired and have a mild headache the first few days they are at altitude and it is recommended to drink plenty of water, eat smaller meals and not to do too many activities. The local remedy for altitude sickness is Coca tea which is said to relieve you of some of the symptoms.

I popped home the weekend before he was due to depart and made sure he had everything ready, turns out he had everything more or less prepped and was ready to go! Then the day came when it was time for him to gLimaet up at the crack of dawn and catch his flight to Lima, since then I got daily emails about his adventures!

The first email was to let us know he had arrived safely and, despite his bag being the last off the plane, the Llama group was there waiting for him and ready to drop him off to his hotel for a good rest. His review of the hotel was: ‘the bed is comfy and the TV has over 50 Spanish channels!’

On his first day in Lima, before he took our Colonial Lima tour he went for a wander around Miraflores and came across an old Elizabethan house with an old biplane in the front garden. My Dad loves planes and flying them and so could not resist having a chat with the security guard at the front of the house (although I am intrigued how the chatting went, as my Dad is not the best at Spanish. I think a lot of hand gestures and facial expressions may have been used!). As Peruvians are some of the loveliest people I have met, I’m not surprised that the security guard let my Dad in and gave him a tour around the house and plane! It was a good start to his holiday, and after he had been on the Llama Travel excursion, he had made some friends to have dinner with.

The next email I received was when he arrived in Cusco after his trip the Jungle, he had a good time and saw 4 kinds of monkeys, various birds, tarantulas, a poisonous snake (called a fer de lance), caimans, and (in hos words!) some strange creatures that looked like giant guinea pigs. Despite having torrential rain on their last day and there being some hold ups, with buses and lorries getting stuck in the mud, they made it to the airport and eventually to Cusco.

I’m afraid that I am not able to re-word my Dad’s adventures as he has described them so well, so here are a few snippets:Ollantaytambo

About our Sacred Valley excursion:

Been along the ‘Sacred Valley’ today.  Some beautiful scenery, and we got a little bit of rain!  We visited Ollantaytambo, which is a sun temple with numerous terraces, which we eventually climbed to the top.  The trip included a nice lunch at a lovely hotel/ restaurant, where we were serenaded by Peruvian music.  The musicians were so good that at times they made music without touching their instruments – wonders of modern electronics!

The Inca Trail:

Have survived the Inca Trail! It was tough going, and on 2 days, towards evening it poured with rain and we all got soaked. I was able to keep just enough dry clothes to put on at night to keep warm in my sleeping bag.foto_02_b  We got some lovely views, often with the clouds below us, and visited some Inca sites en route.  Everyone was exhausted at the end, including the guides.  I slept well when I got back to the hotel!

Andean Village, Maras and Moray:

We visited a Peruvian farmer’s house for lunch, which was very nice and tasty.  We were welcomed on the edge of the village and each given a woven wrist-band as a gift.  Afterward lunch, we were shown their traditional ceremonies they must perform before working on the land, and then how to use their ‘foot-plough’, which is a euphemism for a fancy shovel.  We also visited somSacred Valleye ancient salt-pans which are still being used, and some Inca terracing which creates a temperature difference of 15 – 20 degrees between top and bottom so different crops can be grown on different terraces.

Lake Titicaca:

We had a lovely journey here from Cusco.  Really nice, sunny weather!  No rain all day!  When we arrived the guide commented that they had had rain 2 days ago, which was unheard of – the rainy season is supposed to have finished.  So perhaps I have brought the British weather with me!

The coach here was lovely, very comfy seats, air conditioning, big windows, plenty of leg room.  And I sat at the front and got an even better view. Luxury travel! We stopped at several very interesting places, so I have quite a few photos to show you.  I have also tried to get pictures of some of the characteLake Titicaca boatsrs you see at the roadside.

Had a lovely boat trip on Lake Titicaca today.  We visited the ‘Islands of Reeds’.  Small groups of families have their houses and some ‘land’ around them on floating islands of reeds.  They showed us how they build the islands and houses, and showed us inside their houses. It was an amazing place.

We then visited another island (a real one!) on the Lake.  We had a lovely lunch, which included deliciously cooked trout, at a farm house. The men on this island knit clothes while the women spin and weave. At the end of the trip, we visited an old ‘gun boat’ (which had no guns) and was built in Britain in the 1860’s to help the Peruvians in their war with Chile.  (Chile won).  It’s now a museum piece.  It took 6 years to get it from the Pacific coast to Lake Titicaca.

Arequipa & Colca Canyon:

Arrived at Arequipa last night.  The hotel is on the main square, and has an outside balcony where you can have breakfast and watch what is going on in the square at tColca Canyonhe same time.  So I had a leisurely breakfast doing that, and this afternoon we had a tour round some of the interesting parts of the city.

Got up early this morning to go along the Colca Canyon to see the condors.  We were fortunate and saw a number of condors soaring in the thermals, they are amazing birds, and the canyon is very beautiful.  Also saw a humming bird.”

I’m glad to report the Suzi’s dad made it home safe and sound, with an album full of photos and many stories to tell! If you’ve been inspired to have your own holiday of a lifetime in Peru, you can see a list of all our Peru Holiday here. You can also see a full list of all our amazing Latin America holidays by visiting www.llamatravel.com or by ordering our new brochure.  

DSC_0339For nature lover and professional photographer Glenn Gordon, his holiday with Llama Travel to the Galapagos Islands was an experience and inspiration of a lifetime. He has been kind enough to share not only his amazing photos, but also his words on what in his view makes the Galapagos Islands such a unique and enigmatic place. This is a must read for anyone who is pondering a trip to the Galapagos.

“Two years ago my wife and I travelled to the Galapagos Islands for our honeymoon. Not your typical destination to bask in the ’luna de miele’ you may well be thinking but Lucy has a PhD in animal behavior and adores wildlife. She has wanted to visit the islands since she was a little girl and as a photographer and nature lover myself, I was more than willing to submit to this request.

I have been lucky enough to travel to many exotic destinations across the globe but I cannot ever remember a more palpable sense of anticipation on board a plane, than there was that morning as we made our descent towards that giant sea-horse archipelago of the Pacific. My wife and I had both long read that this was a place to savour and before we had even touched down, we had experienced our first taste.

Out of our window in the middle-distance, giant frigate birds flew in parallel to us, flanking the plane like fighter aircrafts, escorting us down to land. There is definitely something of the pterFrigate Bodactyl about these amazing birds and this only served to enhance the feeling that I was about to set foot in ‘the land that time forgot’. Leaping over lava lizards and circumventing cacti, we scampered across the runway to the surf-shack structure that is Baltra Airport. Finally, we had arrived.

Of course, Galapagos is famous for the tameness of its animals; as a photographer it is simply Heaven. For starters, there is a non-stop abundance of unique and rare creatures to be found in this tiny sanctuary of our planet. But not only this, much more than this, they also advertise themselves completely openly for you to look upon their beauty. Devoid of natural predators for so long, the animals here live without a fear of man like nowhere else on Earth. Sleeping, eating, occasionally affording you the pleasure of their curiosity, they go about their daily lives undaunted. It was truly wonderful to feel so insignificant and unthreatening to such defenceless creatures.

The local people here too, it seems, are as relaxed and approachable as the animals themselves. Our guide and boat crew in particular were polite, friendly, helpful and calm. In fact, for islands born of fire, it is surprisingly hard to imagine life getting heated here at all. Everything seems peaceful and tranquil; from the sunbathing marine iguanas, strewn like confetti on the rocky Sleep Sea Lion B Colourshores of San Cristobal, to the park-bench sleeping sea-lions I found in the town of Peurto Ayora.

On each and every excursion, I was able to get up close and personal to the wildlife with my camera, in a way I could only dream of elsewhere. Whether snorkelling with sea turtles, watching waved albatrosses enjoying their first dance, or trekking with giant-tortoises, there was something breath-taking to photograph at every turn. Even between excursions the wildlife was never too far away, with dancing dolphins ushering us along in the waters below and an endless bridal trains of birds flying behind us overhead.

It may be surprising to learn then , after reading of all this wonder, that the islands were originally described as ‘worthless’ and as ‘hell on earth’ by their early visitors. Even Charles Darwin compared them to the ‘Infernal regions’ but to be brutally honest, I can understand why. If you are expecting an equatorial paradise; miles of unspoilt gleaming white beaches, waterfalls, tropical lagoons or unbroken sunshine, then think again. A mass of black volcanic earth, peppered with scrubland below an overcast sky, is a more accurate description of these somewhat drab and desolate isles.

However, long ago pirates would often usGeorge's Friend Be these islands for refuge; and if you look more closely you will quickly uncover their hidden treasures. The Giant Tortoise, The Galapagos Sea Lion, three iguana species, lava lizards and snakes are all found here and only here alone. As for unique birds; along with the albatrosses there are herons, hawks, doves, penguins, gulls, mockingbirds, finches and of course, the indomitable Flightless Cormorant. Yes, beaches, waterfalls and sunshine can be found in any corner of the world – but make no mistake, there is nowhere quite like Galapagos!

And so as we taxied the runway, accompanied by the frigates for one last time, my thoughts vacillated between waves of sorrow and delight. I felt sad to be leaving but extremely fortunate to have visited these havens of volcanic sand, which get under your feet and under your skin. The honeymoon was over but I knew I had been wedded to these enchanted islands forever.

I have already made them my vow; I will return.”bartholomew_island_bartolome_island

To hear more stories from Glenn, you can visit his blog at www.glennasher-gordon.blogspot.co.uk, and you can see the amazing photos he took whilst in the Galapagos Islands here, and the rest of his professional photographer’s portfolio at www.graygordon.com.

If Glenn’s words have inspired you to visit one of the most magical places on earth, you can see a list of all our holidays to the Galapagos Islands here. You can also see a full list of all our amazing Latin America holidays by visiting www.llamatravel.com or by ordering our brand new brochure.

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